Heinlein’s future history stories of the 30s and 40s

Jo Walton:

In these early stories, Heinlein wrote about the future as if he’d been there. He wrote the most absurd things—the rolling roads of “The Roads Must Roll” and the mathematics of psychology in “Blowups Happen,” but he wrote them with a kind of authority and authenticity that made them seem real. It’s partly the way he drops the details in and writes about it as if it’s routine: “The rockets roared on time; Jake went back to sleep” (“Space Jockey”). Of course he did. Lazarus Long wears a kilt because there’s a fashion for wearing kilts—because that’s the kind of thing that happens. People say they live “in the Moon,” only a groundhog would say “on the Moon.” Of course they do, and of course people from Earth are groundhogs. There’s an inevitability to Heinlein’s futures, however inherently implausible they are, and however much the real future has overtaken them. It’s the inevitability of having people do the kind of things people do, and the kind of thing anyone would do, in the new circumstances. There was more to him than that, but this was Heinlein’s genius—making you read along, making up the world in your head, and saying “Of course.”

Tor.com

An actual tweet from my town’s parks department

This is an actual tweet from my town’s parks department. I am not making this up.

I did not realize that this activity involved tournaments. I don’t even want to know how the winner is decided. Or what they get for a trophy.

Skittles photographer says he was a refugee, doesn’t approve of Trump Jr.’s message

“I was a refugee from the Turkish occupation of Cyprus,” says the guy who took the photo of the Skittles that Donald Trump Jr. used in his toxic tweet.

Richard Irvine-Brown & Patrick Evans, BBC News:

David Kittos, 48, from Guildford, UK, woke up to find an image he had posted to Flickr in January 2010 had become embroiled in a political controversy.

“This was not done with my permission, I don’t support his politics and I would never take his money to use it,” Mr Kittos told the BBC.

“In 1974, when I was six-years old, I was a refugee from the Turkish occupation of Cyprus so I would never approve the use of this image against refugees.”

Get Facebook (and Google+) to support the open Web

Dave Winer wants Facebook to support the open Web.

He wants Facebook updates to support embedded links, titles, enclosures, and styling such as italics and boldface.

I 100% agree. And it applies to Google+ too.

I create and publish my blog with WordPress, and syndicate it as far and wide as I can using the NextScripts Social Networks Auto Poster plugin. On Tumblr, the posts show up in very close to native format. The three social networks that are the worst for preserving original content are the three I care about most: Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

I’d settle for less than Dave. I’d be happy if Facebook and Google+ supported embedded links and blockquotes. And let me post using that formatting with a third-party app, like WordPress.

Twitter is a lost cause. It’s always going to have that 140-character limit. Twitter flirted with changing that, but changed its mind.

All I want to do is share my posts in ways so that people who want to see them can easily and conveniently do so. Why does it have to be so goddamn hard?

More from Dave:

Why Notes are not the answer. Very few people read Facebook notes, and there isn’t a standard API for writing to notes using an external program like WordPress or Dave’s own 1999.io.

“All silos are not equally silo-y”: Twitter is a silo, but you can link to a tweet from elsewhere and someone else can read it even if they aren’t logged in. On Facebook, that’s confusing and often not true.

The original patent from 1891 for a toilet paper roll shows the correct rolling direction, in case you ever doubted