Tag Archives: murder

He was told his father walked out in 1961. Then he started digging up the basement [The Washington Post]

Authorities have identified the remains of a man buried in the basement of a Long Island home for 57 years as George Caroll. They say he died of blunt force trauma to the head. Now it’s a murder investigation.

A hell of a whodunnit in Lake Grove, not far from where I grew up. I covered Lake Grove for a community newspaper in the 1980s.

Julian Assange has become a full-blown Hillary conspiracy theorist

Assange is suggesting that the Clinton campaign may have been behind the recent murder of DNC staffer Seth Rich.

According to Eric Kleefeld, The New Republic, Assange told Dutch TV:

“Whistleblowers go to significant efforts to get us material, and often very significant risks. There’s a 27-year-old that works for the DNC who was shot in the back, murdered, just a few weeks ago, for unknown reasons as he was walking down the streets in Washington.”

Van Rosenthal interjected that the murder of DNC staffer Seth Rich was a robbery. After Assange dug in further, the host asked him what he was suggesting. “I’m suggesting that our sources take risks—and they become concerned to see things occurring like that,” Assange answered. He added that WikiLeaks is looking into this. The group has also posted a $20,000 reward for information leading to conviction for Rich’s murder.

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The attacks left two dead and two in critical condition. Anthony Alexander Padgett, 36 was arrested and charged on two counts of murder, two counts attempted murder, and one count of arson.

Whodunit?

44 Years Later, a Washington, D.C. Death Unresolved [Lance Morrow – Smithsonian Magazine]

Mary Pinchot Meyer’s murdered body was discovered on the banks of a canal in Georgetown, an affluent Washington D.C. community, in 1964. Meyer was a bohemian and artist, mistress of John F. Kennedy, friend of Jackie Kennedy, and ex-wife of Cord Meyer, known then as a wounded World War II hero, idealist, and author, with a vague government job. Now, we know he managed the CIA’s clandestine services. In 2008, her murder was still a mystery.

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In 1979, the Ku Klux Klan murdered members of the American Communist Workers Party at a rally in a North Carolina small town. Police looked the other way.

39 Shots – Criminal

In 1979, a group of labor organizers protested outside a Ku Klux Klan screening of the 1915 white supremacist film, The Birth of a Nation. Nelson Johnson and Signe Waller-Foxworth remember shouting at armed Klansmen and burning a confederate flag, until eventually police forced the KKK inside and the standoff ended without violence. The labor organizers felt they’d won a small victory, and planned a much bigger anti-Klan demonstration in Greensboro, North Carolina. They advertised with the slogan: “Death to the Klan” and set the date for November 3rd, 1979.

As protestors assembled, a caravan of nine cars appeared, and a man in a pick-up truck yelled: “You asked for the Klan! Now you’ve got them!” Thirty-nine shots were fired in eighty-eight seconds, and five protestors were killed. The city of Greensboro is still grappling with the complicated legacy of that day.

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Two accountants believe they’ve cracked a 35-year-old murder

The Criminal podcast:

Since 1965, there’s been an unsolved murder in Houston, Texas. The main suspect managed to disappear and police were never able to find him. The case is still considered open. In 1997, a couple of accountants decided to look into the murders, and were able to uncover evidence that the police missed. They think they’ve solved the mystery.

Learn more about Hugh and Martha’s book: The Ice Box Murders.

Hugh and Martha got married. Their love of sleuthing brought them together.

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Ohio Dr. Sam Sheppard was convicted, and later acquitted, of killing his wife.

Sheppared claimed a man broke into the house and that he, Sheppard, fought to defend his wife, receiving injuries in the attack but failing to prevent the murder. The state claimed that Sheppard’s injuries were inflicted by his wife as she attempted unsuccessfully to defend herself from her husband.

He spent 10 years in prison for the crime. When he got out, things got weird.

The Memory Palace podcast has the story: Finishing Hold

Sam Sheppard – Wikipedia

Winston Moseley, Who Killed Kitty Genovese, Dies in Prison at 81

Kitty Genovese

He stalked, raped, and killed the Queens bar manager in 1964, while her neighbors failed to act on her cries for help, a crime which came to be symbol of urban apathy – even though the details were untrue, fueled by an erroneous story in The New York Times.

While there was no question that the attack occurred, and that some neighbors ignored cries for help, the portrayal of 38 witnesses as fully aware and unresponsive was erroneous. The article grossly exaggerated the number of witnesses and what they had perceived. None saw the attack in its entirety. Only a few had glimpsed parts of it, or recognized the cries for help. Many thought they had heard lovers or drunks quarreling. There were two attacks, not three. And afterward, two people did call the police. A 70-year-old woman ventured out and cradled the dying victim in her arms until they arrived. Ms. Genovese died on the way to a hospital.

But the account of 38 witnesses heartlessly ignoring a murderous attack was widely disseminated and took on a life of its own, shocking the national conscience and starting an avalanche of academic studies, investigations, films, books, even a theatrical production and a musical. The soul-searching went on for decades, long after the original errors were debunked, evolving into more parable than fact but continuing to reinforce images of urban Americans as too callous or fearful to call for help, even with a life at stake.

But Mosely, a serial killer and necrophiliac, was as bad as he seemed.

Winston Moseley, Who Killed Kitty Genovese, Dies in Prison at 81 [Robert D. McFadden – The New York Times]

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“Jolly Jane” Toppan worked as a nurse in New England in the late 19th Century and was well-loved by her patients for her conscientious attention and cheerful disposition. She confessed to poisoning 31 of those patients, and quite possibly did in a lot more.

[Criminal Episode 38: Jolly Jane]