AT&T: What Is ‘open source,’ anyway?

Me, Light Reading:

Companies evaluating open source technology need to be careful that they get all the open source benefits. That’s sometimes tricky, which is why AT&T has defined “three key characteristics of open source software that we consider paramount,” says Greg Stiegler, AT&T assistant vice president of cloud.

Cisco throws 5,500 overboard on cruise to richer waters

Me, Light Reading:

Cisco said Wednesday it is eliminating 5,500 positions, 7% of its workforce, as part of an ongoing shift to recurring, software-based revenue models and the cloud.

That’s not as bad as expected. CRN reported Tuesday that Cisco would be laying off 14,000 employees — nearly a fifth of its workforce of 73,000.

Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins said Wednesday that Cisco plans to reinvest the benefits of the layoffs in its growth businesses — security, Internet of Things, collaboration, next-generation data center and cloud.

Ow my head

I wrote an email to our new corporate HR department summarizing my employment history with UBM/CMP Media. The email took a while to write. It’s more complicated than the storyline of the Back to the Future movies.

By my count, I was hired by the same company … four times? I think  it was four times. I  quit once (twice if you count the transition to Light Reading), and was laid off twice. During the years I worked for them, CMP was acquired by United Business Media, which I think changed its name to just UBM.

Open source explodes enterprise procurement

Me, Light Reading:

 Open source gives startups an opportunity to shoulder big vendors aside by leveraging the cloud to disrupt traditional relationships, says Martin Casado, a pioneering software-defined networking entrepreneur turned venture capitalist.

Google buys Orbitera: Why you should care

Me, Light Reading:

Google this week acquired Orbitera, which specializes in enabling software sales over the cloud. It’s an acquisition with broader implications than first impressions might suggest.

On the surface, it’s a niche service, with appeal only to software developers. But there’s more to it than meets the eye. In the words of Nan Boden, Google(Nasdaq: GOOG)’s head of global technology partners, writing on the Google Cloud Platform blog Monday to announce the acquisition: “Orbitera provides a commerce platform that makes buying and selling software in the cloud simple, seamless, and scalable for all kinds of businesses, including independent software vendors, service providers and IT channel organizations.”

Translation: It’s not just for application developers. Orbitera makes it easier for service providers and enterprise IT managers to license and deploy apps for their users, both within their own companies and to customers and business partners. It’s a platform for third-party apps and enterprises’ and service providers’ own homegrown software.

The acquisition — the terms of which were not disclosed — is designed to beef up Google’s strategy to help enterprises support multiple clouds.

More at Light Reading.

Informa acquires Light Reading. I work for Informa now.

I’m still digesting this. We just got the news less than two hours ago.

I have an article to write this morning, and earnings calls in the afternoon, so I’ll focus on that. I’ve been through one acquisition before, and too many reorganizations to count. Best thing a person can do in a situation like this is keep doing their job.

Further out, I do see potentially interesting opportunities coming from this.

Cisco Live in pics: Who needs flying cars?

LAS VEGAS — Cisco Live — In the middle of a virtual reality demo of the Internet of Things for transportation, my smartwatch buzzed my wrist with a notification from the real world. Later, I got into a spirited disagreement with a woman from a company called Gupshup about how much personality chatbots should have.

“We’re living the future!” I thought, and used my pocket computer, connected to a global wireless network, to instantly shared the insight with thousands of friends all over the world.

We’re almost never amazed anymore by technology miracles like IoT, chatbots and wireless networks. We take them for granted. And yet, as Yvette Kanouff, SVP/GM service provider business for Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO), observed at a Thursday session here, it’s up to service providers to deliver the bandwidth to make it all go. “It’s wonderful for the world to talk about how everything, everywhere is going to be connected, but the pressure is on us to provide the bandwidth and make it work,” she said.

Cisco Live is the company’s annual conference for its enterprise customers. Light Reading was there with its trusty camera. Here’s some of what we saw.

More photos: Cisco Live in Pics: Who Needs Flying Cars?

Me on Light Reading.

Europe’s biggest telcos threaten to withhold 5G investment over net neutrality regulations

Iain Morris reports on Light Reading:

The never-ending saga of net neutrality has taken a fresh twist with news that a number of Europe’s biggest telcos have essentially threatened to withhold investment in new 5G networks unless rules are relaxed.

In a “manifesto” issued Thursday, major communications service providers including BT Group plc (NYSE: BT; London: BTA), Deutsche Telekom AG(NYSE: DT), Orange (NYSE: FTE), Telecom Italia SpA (NYSE: TI), Telefónicaand Vodafone Group plc (NYSE: VOD) promised to launch a 5G network in a minimum of one major city per European Union (EU) country by 2020 and then invest further, but only if they get the net neutrality assurances they demand.

The manifesto was endorsed by 17 companies in total, including equipment vendors Ericsson AB (Nasdaq: ERIC) and Nokia Corp. (NYSE: NOK).

Looks like the UK has voted itself the worst of EU membership with none of the benefits.

My colleague Iain Morris analyzes the impact on two British telcos, but some of his insights in the second half of the article seem generally applicable.

Brezit will not accomplish its main goal of controlling immigration. And Britain will be required to abide by EU regulations to continue doing business with Europe, but it won’t get a say in how those rules are written.

‘Brexit’ Vote Hits BT, Vodafone [Iain Morris/Light Reading]

Corporate takeover

Red Hat Buys 3Scale for API Management

Red Hat has announced a definitive agreement to add API management to its portfolio by acquiring 3Scale. The acquisition adds an important piece to Red Hat’s strategy to build a complete stack for cloud, microservice and other enterprise applications.

[Me/Light Reading]

RIP

AWS CEO: Enterprise Data Center Is Doomed

Enterprise data centers are on their way to becoming rare beasts, as nearly every enterprise is going to move nearly all their computing to the cloud, Amazon Web Services CEO Andy Jassy said Tuesday.

“In the fullness of time, whether it’s ten years or 20 years, very few companies will own their own data centers, and those that do will have a smaller footprint than they have now,” Jassy said during a presentation at the AWS Summit in Washington, D.C. and streamed live.

The transition will lead to qualitative changes in the enterprise, Jassy said.

[Me/Light Reading]

Up in smoke

Microsoft Gets Baked in Cannabis Cloud

Dude, Microsoft is stoked to be partnering with a Los Angeles startup to provide cloud services to help governments ensure marijuana businesses are regulatory compliant.

Kidding aside, this is serious business. Microsoft is partnering with Kind Financial for technology to governments for “seed to sale tracking.”

[Me/Light Reading]