Tag Archives: fun

Mitch

October 8, 2016

Today’s creative writing: 782 new words, 15,953 words total, on “The Reluctant Magician.”

I had another one of those days where I had to talk myself into doing any writing at all, but once I sat down it flowed.

I’m in the middle of a section of wiseguy banter now. Those are always fun to write. Next: A fight scene. Also fun to write.

We are not amused: The tyranny of forced fun at work

Companies are setting aside work time for leisure, with required employee participation, in the name of team-building.

Alina Dizik, the BBC

[Veronique James, chief executive of The James Agency, a Scottsdale, Ariz., ad firm] budgets $20,000 per year for events, which are considered part of employee benefits for tax purposes. The 30-person team has gone indoor skydiving, taken a ballroom dancing class and gone through an afternoon of trapeze training together.

Sounds awful.

Link

Pokemon Go takes money out of local communities and centralizes it to big corporations, and that’s what’s wrong with late capitalism, says Timothy B. Lee at Vox:

If you were looking to have fun with some friends 50 years ago, you might have gone to a bowling alley. Maybe you would have hung out at a diner or gone to the movies.

These were all activities that involved spending a certain amount of money in the local economy. That created opportunities for adults in your town to start and run small businesses. It also meant that a teenager who wanted to find a summer job could find one waiting tables or taking tickets at the movie theater.

You can spend money on Pokémon Go too. But the economics of the game are very different. When you spend money on items in the Pokémon Go world, it doesn’t go into the pocket of a local Pokémon entrepreneur — it goes into the pockets of the huge California- and Japan-based global companies that created Pokémon Go.

There are, of course, some good things about this. Pokémon Go can be a much more affordable hobby than going to a bowling alley or the movies. In fact, you don’t have to spend any money on it. And the explosion of options made possible by online platforms creates real value — the average teenager has vastly more options for games to play, movies to watch, and so forth than at any time in American history.