Tag Archives: Facebook

Inside Facebook’s Secret Rulebook for Global Political Speech

An unelected council of a few dozen Facebook employees decides what more than 2 billion people are allowed to share. Facebook “has quietly become, with a speed that makes even employees uncomfortable, what is arguably one of the world’s most powerful political regulators.” Max Fisher investigates in depth at www.nytimes.com…

Facebook Is Developing a Cryptocurrency for WhatsApp Transfers, Sources Say

The first focus will be on the remittance market in India, as Facebook works on its blockchain strategy. [Sarah Frier and Julie Verhage/Bloomberg]

And today I learned what a “stablecoin” is — intriguing concept that removes one of the big flaws of cryptocurrency.

How to Delete Facebook [Brian X. Chen/The New York Times]

If you’ve been very active on Facebook, deleting your account isn’t easy.

I have avoided using Facebook — or Google, Twitter, or anybody else — to log in to other sites. Bad idea to trust my logins to a third party. It’s not hard to create a separate login for each site and use a password manager (I use 1Password) to track them all.

Facebook’s biggest problem is that I can stop using it and be fine [Alex Sherman/CNBC]

Nobody needs Facebook, and that’s a problem for the company.

I’ve been struggling with my conscience this year about my Facebook usage.

On the one hand, Facebook has numerous, documented problems.

On the other hand, it brings people together.

I enjoy the conversation on Facebook, which I don’t find anywhere else — and I know from experience that asking people to follow me on another platform just doesn’t work.

And I use Facebook for professional and community activities.

I don’t know what to do about this. What do you think?

Dear tech companies, I don’t want to see pregnancy ads after my child was stillborn [Gillian Brockell/The Washington Post]

Tech companies need to make it easier for people to customize the ads they see, says the mother of a stillborn child who wants to stop seeing ads for baby products.

Heartbreaking essay. I only had an inkling what people go through when their child is stillborn. I guess I always thought of it as being something like recovering from a serious, but short-lived illness, like when an otherwise healthy person gets pneumonia or a burst appendix. It’s really more like losing a child, isn’t it?

Facebook ends platform policy banning apps that copy its features [Josh Constine/TechCrunch]

Facebook will now freely allow developers to build competitors to its features upon its own platform. Today Facebook announced it will drop Platform Policy section 4.1, which stipulates ‘Add something unique to the community. Don’t replicate core functionality that Facebook already provides.'” I’d love to see an add-on that turns the News Feed into a real blogging platform, that I can publish to from WordPress. A boy can dream, can’t he?

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Liberal Christopher Blair writes a satirical Facebook page called “America’s Last Line of Defense,” containing outrageous fabricated hit pieces about the Clintons, the Obamas and Sharia law invading the US. Millions of American right wingers eat it up. “No matter how racist, how bigoted, how offensive, how obviously fake we get, people keep coming back,” says Blair, who is doing a terrible thing that is helping destroy America.

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One simple change that can fix social media

On Benjamen Walker’s Theory of Everything podcast: Kathy Sierra was bullied off social media twice by vicious death threats, for her opinions about user interface design. (Yes, UI design). Now she proposes one simple change that could fix social media. And Chris discloses the secret origin of Facebook.

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Dave Winer: Less Facebook is OK

Dave is my blogging spirit animal. I like blogging, and I like sharing on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr, and Medium. Of those platforms, I get the most return from Facebook. But blogging AND sharing to Facebook and Google+ are just too much work. So I’m going to start focusing mainly on the blog, and just automatically share links to Google+ and Facebook, until those platforms become easier to deal with in conjunction with a blog.

I’m working on figuring out a way I can share short updates directly to those services and to the blog simultaneously. This will involve automated email and plenty of duck tape.

You’re welcome to leave comments here, or on Facebook or Google+. Or just stop reading, even if you’re a close friend or member of my immediate family. I do not require other people to participate in my peculiar hobby.

I will revisit this decision when it doesn’t seem to be working for me, or when the tools for sharing blog content to social media get easier to work with.

I’ll keep mirroring my posts to Tumblr and Medium because that’s easy.

And I’m still trying to figure out what to do about Twitter.

How to unplug when you should

Do you obsessively fiddle with your phone all the time? Win back some mental space with these tips – Michael Duran, Wired

I see many articles like this. They all recommend similar steps. Don’t put your phone in your pocket, keep it in your desk where you have to make some effort to get it. Go a couple of days without connectivity.

These tips are not helpful. Keeping my phone out of reach would create more problems than it’s worth, because it’s a legitimate inconvenience when my phone is out of reach. The problem is that I fiddle with the phone at times when I should be doing something else. THAT’S what I’m looking to control.

Going a few days without connectivity is like going without electricity. It’s doable. People call that “camping.” And it’s good for you. But it’s kind of a big deal. Not to be entered into casually.

One tip that is helpful: Turn off nearly all your notifications. You do NOT want to be notified when you get new email, a mention or comment on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc. You just don’t.

Facebook, Twitter join network to tackle fake news

The coalition includes 30 media and technology companies, including Google, the New York Times, The Washington Post, and more.

Billion-dollar companies are openly conspiring to make sure we only find out what they decide is legitimate news. But it’s for our own good, so that’s nothing to be concerned about.

(Angela Moon, Reuters)

Ulysses vs. Scrivener

In a brief Reddit discussion, users of both writing apps ding Ulysses for relying on Markdown for formatting, while Scrivener uses rich text.

That surprises me. I find Markdown quite natural, which goes a long way to explaining why I do most of my writing in Ulysses.

I’m writing this post in Markdown, and if you’re reading it on Facebook or Google+, that’s how you’re reading it. But I’m not writing this post in Ulysses; I’m composing it directly in WordPress, which is how I do most of my writing for the blog and social media.

Via the Mac Power Users podcast, which compares Scrivener and Ulysses. I’m listening to the episode now.

Yep, Facebook censored me when I posted the ‘napalm girl’ photo

I actually posted it twice, in connection with two separate articles. The first article is still up, and it’s also here on the public web.

However, Facebook deleted a second instance, which is here on the public web.

Facebook also issued me a warning. I think it suspended my account briefly — not sure; the notices went by quickly.

And Facebook required me to go through my photo album to be sure I don’t have any more nude photos in there. I did not look at each one, just thought for a second about whether I remembered posting any nude photos, decided I hadn’t, and clicked OK.

This is a big reason why I consider mitchwagner.com… my home on the web even though far more people interact with me on social media. Social media is fickle.

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What Facebook gets wrong about that napalm-girl photo

Facebook is partly right: That is a disturbing photo.

But what’s disturbing about it isn’t the nudity.

What’s disturbing is that it’s a photo of a child who’s been severely burned in a napalm attack. A napalm attack by an American ally in an American war.

And it’s disturbing that Facebook thinks it’s the nudity that’s the problem.

Facebook Censors Iconic Vietnam War Photo Over Nudity – Mark Scott, The New York Times

Facebook censors iconic Pulitzer-prize-winning ‘napalm girl’ photo

A Norwegian newspaper published the photo as one of seven that “changed the history of warfare.” Writer Tom Egeland was suspended from Facebook. Now, the Norwegian prime minister published the photo, had it deleted by Facebook, and called on the social company to change its policies.

What if Facebook decides Trump is a monster who must be stopped, and starts censoring pro-Trump posts?

Facebook deletes Norwegian PM’s post as ‘napalm girl’ row escalates

Get Facebook (and Google+) to support the open Web

Dave Winer wants Facebook to support the open Web.

He wants Facebook updates to support embedded links, titles, enclosures, and styling such as italics and boldface.

I 100% agree. And it applies to Google+ too.

I create and publish my blog with WordPress, and syndicate it as far and wide as I can using the NextScripts Social Networks Auto Poster plugin. On Tumblr, the posts show up in very close to native format. The three social networks that are the worst for preserving original content are the three I care about most: Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

I’d settle for less than Dave. I’d be happy if Facebook and Google+ supported embedded links and blockquotes. And let me post using that formatting with a third-party app, like WordPress.

Twitter is a lost cause. It’s always going to have that 140-character limit. Twitter flirted with changing that, but changed its mind.

All I want to do is share my posts in ways so that people who want to see them can easily and conveniently do so. Why does it have to be so goddamn hard?

More from Dave:

Why Notes are not the answer. Very few people read Facebook notes, and there isn’t a standard API for writing to notes using an external program like WordPress or Dave’s own 1999.io….

“All silos are not equally silo-y”: Twitter is a silo, but you can link to a tweet from elsewhere and someone else can read it even if they aren’t logged in. On Facebook, that’s confusing and often not true.