Dog euthanized after fatally biting baby

The death of that baby is an awful, awful tragedy.

Normally, I’d be saddened when a dog that looks this sweet is put down, but I can’t bring myself to feel that in this case. Not that I blame the dog. She was just being a dog. Still, for me to be saddened by this dog’s death seems disrespectful to that baby and family. Irrational, but that’s how I feel.

We’re relatively new to owning dogs and I don’t know a lot but I do know this: Dogs are animals. They are predators. I am often amazed at the sheer strength of Minnie’s jaws, as she sits there quietly and peacefully working on a chew toy while we sit on the couch together.

Sometimes little kids will come up to us at the park and say, “Mister, can I pet your dog?” My answer is always no. Minnie doesn’t get much exposure to people other than me and Julie. I don’t want something bad to happen.

Critter homecoming

Vivvie (cat): Ran and hid. I have not seen her except briefly when I got home.

Lucy (cat): Briefly let me pat her while she was sitting on top of the cat tree.

Sammy (cat): Demanded much petting, sat in my lap, only bit me once.

Minnie: Picked her up at the dog boarders. She seemed skinny and subdued. I wonder if she’s been eating. She was shy around me. She perked up when she got home and picked up a couple of her favorite toys and trotted around the yard with them. She was happy to see Sammy. Now she’s asleep on the sofa next to me, emitting contented dog noises and twitching occasionally and slightly in her dreams. I have read that dogs are often exhausted after daycare and boarding. We’ll see how she seems tomorrow.

As for the gadgets:

Internet suffered an outage tonight. I fixed it by unplugging the Powerline Wi-Fi adapter and plugging it back in again. Roku remote stopped working for no apparent reason at all. I had to unplug the Roku to get it to shut up. Dead batteries?

I am ded to the world, having been up since 5 am PDT and traveling 13 hours of that time. Back to work tomorrow morning. And so to walk dog, change cats’ water dishes, and bed.

For my bucket list: Go a month without either Julie or I having to take any of the animals to the vet.

Minnie_recovering_from_foxtail

Minnie yipped in pain while rolling around on the ground on Thursday morning’s walk. After that, she was moving slow all day, tilting her head to one side and shaking it frequently. At about four I left my home office to get a snack from the kitchen and she didn’t come with me. That was worrisome. She almost always follows me out of the office. So we threw Minnie in the car and took her to the vet.

There was much Piteous Cowering, and the vet looked into Minnie’s ear with one of those look-into-ear lights that doctors and vets have. Oho, he said, and got forcepsĀ and pulled a foxtail out Minnie’s ear. Ta-da! He squirted some antibiotic goop in, and Minnie was almost instantly better, back to her old self.

A foxtail is a thing like a feathery splinter, about as long as a fingernail. If you have them in your part of the world, you’ve probably pulled them off your socks in warm weather. They stick like Velcro and can be very dangerous on the skin or internally.

Total cost: $56 and 45 minutes (we were lucky — they could take us quickly).

We don’t let Minnie rub her head on the ground or roll around in dirt anymore. However, I expect this is not our first foxtail encounter. The vet says foxtails are a solid moneymaker for their offices in the warmer months.

The picture isĀ Minnie recovering after her surgery. You can see her right ear is goopy. She was back to her normal, frenetic self as soon as the foxtail came out of her ear.