Tag Archives: Apple

Do not adjust your set: Hats off to Apple, you struggle to shift iPhones ‘cos you’re oddly ethical [Andrew Orlowski/The Register]

Apple has trouble selling new phones because its old phones are too good. Unlike Android phones, which become obsolete rapidly, iPhones just keep on keeping on.

The main reason I chose to upgrade this year is because I got tired of lugging around a big-ass iPhone 7 Plus. If I’d gone instead for the iPhone 7 two years ago, i’d still be using it.

I still see many people using phones that appear to be the iPhone 6. That’s a four-year-old phone.

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Bruce Schneier is skeptical of the Bloomberg supply-chain attack on Apple and Amazon servers, among others. He said if it was true, we’d have seen a photo of the chip by now.

That raises a good thumb rule for judging the veracity of any explosive investigative report. Particularly high-profile sexual harassment charges, like Bill Cosby and Harvey Weinstein. Corroborating reports start to come out after the initial expose.

macOS Sierra review: Mixing iOS with OS X to make a better Mac

Roman Loyola, MacWorld

I’m going to hold off on upgrading for a good long time. I’m not seeing anything here that’s compelling.

Siri is the marquee feature. I use Siri when it’s impractical for me to type, which is never when I’m at my Mac.

Well, I can’t type when I’m eating, and I do often eat at my Mac. But I don’t think Siri will be helpful there. When I’m eating my mouth is often full of food, so it’s impractical to type OR speak!

Big changes are always unpopular

John Gruber relates Apple’s decision to drop headphone jack to bigger issues:

“When we think of controversial decisions, we tend to think of both sides as creating controversy. Choose A and the B proponents will be angry; choose B and the A proponents will be angry. But when it comes to controversial change of the status quo, it’s not like that. Only the people who are opposed to the change get outraged. Leave things as they are and there is no controversy. The people who aren’t outraged by the potential change are generally ambivalent about it, not in a fervor for it. Strong feelings against change on one side, and widespread ambivalence on the other. That’s why the status quo is generally so slow to change, in fields ranging from politics to technology.”

I would not even describe myself as “ambivalent” about Apple’s decision to drop the headphone jack. Really, what it comes down to is I don’t give a darn. I switched to Bluetooth a couple of years ago. The only time I use that 3.5-mm jack is to connect the iPhone to the cassette adapter in my car. And a Bluetooth car adapter only costs $25-$40.

In politics, it takes a crisis to bring about big changes. When things are gradually declining — as they are now in the US — people want to just kick the problem down the road a little longer.

New Apple Watch. Tempting, but not compelling.

I’m happy with my Pebble Time. The Apple Watch is better for me — but $369+ better?

Apple Watch Series 2 announced with swimproof shell and GPS for $369 – Nick Statt, The Verge

The Pebble Time is water-resistant, same as the new Apple Watch. I can wash my hands or do dishes with the watch on. I hear I can shower with it too, but I like to get my wrist clean when I shower.

The Apple Watch would integrate a lot better with my favorite apps. But is that worth $369+ to me?

Apple said to plan first Pro laptop overhaul in four years

Mark Gurman, Bloomberg:

Apple Inc. is preparing the first significant overhaul of its MacBook Pro laptop line in over four years, according to people familiar with the matter, using one of its older products to help reverse two quarters of sliding sales.

The updated notebooks will be thinner, include a touch screen strip for function keys, and will be offered with more powerful and efficient graphics processors for expert users such as video gamers, said the people, who asked not to be named.

I may be getting one of these. Not probably, but possibly. I’ll be pleased if it works out.

Nobel economist Joseph Stiglitz calls Apple’s tax strategy ‘a fraud’

Jeanna Smialek and Alex Webb, Bloomberg:

“Here we have the largest corporation in capitalization not only in America, but in the world, bigger than GM was at its peak, and claiming that most of its profits originate from about a few hundred people working in Ireland — that’s a fraud,” Stiglitz said. “A tax law that encourages American firms to keep jobs abroad is wrong, and I think we can get a consensus in America to get that changed.”

Apple has a corporate structure that allows it to transfer money to low-tax jurisdictions, and one of those is Ireland, where the corporate tax rate is 12.5 percent — far below the U.S. top statutory rate of 35 percent. The European Commission, the European Union’s executive arm, is probing whether Ireland violated the bloc’s state-aid rules by helping Apple lower its Irish tax liability.

 Apple, which declined to comment on Stiglitz’s remarks, has firmly denied using any tax gimmicks, telling an EU tax panel in March that it had paid all of its taxes due in Ireland. Apple employs 5,500 people in Ireland, according to its website.

Stiglitz Calls Apple’s Profit Reporting in Ireland ‘a Fraud’ – Bloomberg

Via Cory Doctorow, Boing Boing, who says:

Apple, Google and other tech giants have shown themselves to be capable of resisting government demands when it suits their interests — see, for example, Apple’s brave and admirable stance on being forced to compromise its cryptography — but when it comes to things like paying its fair share of tax to compensate its host nations for the educations provided to its workforce, the roads they drive on, the courts and laws that defend their interests, and the health systems that keep the majority of their workforce dying from TB or yellow fever, the companies’ stance is “We comply with all laws and pay as much tax as they require.”