Why do we work so hard? Our jobs have become prisons from which we don’t want to escape

When I was young, there was nothing so bad as being asked to work. Now I find it hard to conjure up that feeling, but I see it in my five-year-old daughter. “Can I please have some water, daddy?”

“You can get it yourself, you’re a big girl.”

“WHY DOES EVERYONE ALWAYS TREAT ME LIKE A MAID?”

That was me when I was young, rolling on the ground in agony on being asked to clean my room. As a child, I wonderingly observed the hours my father worked. The stoical way he went off to the job, chin held high, seemed a beautiful, heroic embrace of personal suffering. The poor man! How few hours he left himself to rest on the couch, read or watch American football.

My father had his own accounting firm in Raleigh, North Carolina. His speciality was helping people manage their tax and financial affairs as they started, expanded, or in some cases shut down their businesses. He has taken his time retiring, and I now realise how much he liked his work. I can remember the glowing terms in which his clients would tell me about the help he’d given them, as if he’d performed life-saving surgery on them. I also remember the way his voice changed when he received a call from a client when at home. Suddenly he spoke with a command and facility that I never heard at any other time, like a captive penguin released into open water, swimming in his element with natural ease.

Our parents worked to live. We look at work as life, a source of identity, community, purpose, and personal connections, writes Ryan Avent at The Economist.

Why Do We Work So Hard / Ryan Avent / The Economist]

This article is troubling as it skates past people who work – or can’t find work – out of economic desperation.