Advice to a friend who’s hit a plateau losing weight

I hit a plateau on my weight loss until I took two steps:

Increased my daily exercise from a half-hour to an hour. There was a medical study that said that people who exercised a half-hour a day had difficulty losing weight. But people who exercised an hour a day were much more successful.

The cut-off was around 54 or 56 minutes.

The study was done on women, but I have been given to understand that women and men are the same species.

On the other hand, women seem to find it much, much harder than men to lose weight; their metabolism fights them much harder to keep the pounds on. So a study of weight loss done solely on women is likely to be less applicable to men.

Still, it worked for me.

Adjusting calories. I lost weight by counting calories using the Lose It! iPhone app. After a long period of weight-loss plateaus, I evolved the following thumb rules:

– Any week where I kept to my eating program and maintained or gained weight, I would cut 25 calories from Lose It’s recommended daily allowance.

– Likewise, any week where I lost more than 2 pounds, I’d add 25 calories to the Lose It recommendation. Because losing weight at a moderate pace is one of the keys to maintaining weight loss.

I’m following a similar calorie-counting regime to maintain weight; if my weight is getting too low, I add 25 calories per day to my program, and if I gain more than a half-pound or so, I subtract 25 calories per day. My weight has been swinging between 171 and 174 since January, which seems pretty good to me.

Yes, all of this calorie counting and fiddling seems like an enormous hassle, but (1) I evolved this system over the nearly two years it took me to lose weight. It started simple: Download Lose It!, use it to keep a food journal of every bite you eat, measure everything, keep within the Lose It! recommended calorie limits. Over time, it got more complicated as I made adjustments, but it’s all been very manageable. (2) It beats being fat. I think of myself as a disabled person; I don’t have that barometer part of my brain that governs eating and exercise in normal people. As disabilities go, it’s not a bad one to have (although I don’t get a special parking space, dagnabbit).

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